Megaskepasma erythroclamys ‘Brazilian Cloak’

 Brazilian Red Cloak - 'Megaskepasma' orythrochlamys

compiled by

Lee Spindler

Where is it from?

Venezula, Costa Rica and surrounding countries.

Where can you grow it ?

As far south as Sydney depending on conditions, maybe further south in a warm protected position.

The Brazilian Red Cloak is a very showy shrub. It is fast growing and blooms during the winter. Use mulch to keep the soil moist. The red cloak is occasionally attacked by mealy bugs and scales. Check for them. Deadheading the spent flower branches helps controlling the size and keep the red cloak cleaner looking. Feed occasionally with fertilizer for acid-loving plants.

Care
Megaskepasma prefer a semi shade position but will also grow in full sun, they are tolerant to light frosts. Most soil types are ok, but a rich free draining soil is ideal, a general purpose slow release fertiliser used in conjunction with a liquid feed through the warmer months will ensure healthy growth. The only maintenance required is an annual prune after flowering.
While flowering Megaskepasma can deadheaded to maintain appearance and then it can be pruned to shape, usually in spring. Propagation is from cuttings taken in late spring as it strikes easily from semi hardwood cuttings if you use a rooting hormone, powder or liquid. Remember that this plant does require a moist position and is not frost tolerant. Mulch well to retain moisture.

Uses
Excellent in tropical gardens, can also be planted in with other assorted perrenials or grown in a pot to give a tropical feel to outdoor living areas.

Category:
Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Height:
12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Spacing:
4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Hardiness:

Sun Exposure:
Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:
N/A

Bloom Color:
Scarlet (Dark Red)

Bloom Time:
Late Winter/Early Spring

Foliage:
Evergreen
Veined

Other details:
Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Soil pH requirements:
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:
Non-patented

Propagation Methods:
From semi-hardwood cuttings

Seed Collecting:
Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed